Recurrent Infections: Bacterial Vaccines

Recurrent Infections: Bacterial Vaccines

Bacterial Vaccines work by stimulating the immune system to increase resistance to the bacteria that causes infections.

They are preparations containing inactivated whole bacteria and are generally administered in the form of a sublingual spray. Inactivated whole bacteria are used, presenting no infectious capacity, and are chosen based on those most frequently producing the infections to be treated.

Immunotherapy with mucosal vaccines has recently been shown to be an effective option that increases the person's immunity to prevent new infections.

Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Respiratory Tract Infections (RTIs), and Ear Nose Throat (ENT) infections are common bacterial infections that can be treated with Bacterial Vaccines. While the most common treatment for these is with antibiotics, bacterial vaccines can help reduce the occurrence in the first place and therefore consumption of antibiotics.